Hunter

  • Hunter holds hearing in Chicago on solutions to affordable housing crisis

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  • Remember when Gov. Rauner wanted to eliminate DCFS scholarships? Senator Hunter does.

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  • Black Caucus holds Bruce Rauner accountable for hurting minority contractors

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  • Hunter welcomes Class 5A football champs

    hunter bball 051518State Senator Mattie Hunter and members of the Illinois Senate welcomed Wendell Phillips High School's IHSA Class 5A championship winning football team. Wendell Phillips High School is located in the Bronzeville neighborhood on the south side of Chicago. Wendell is the only high school in Chicago Public League history to ever win a state football championship. The team is led by head coach Mr. Troy McAllister.

  • Van Pelt introduces plan to reform use of controversial gang databases

    Sen. Patricia Van PeltSPRINGFIELD – Use of controversial gang databases by police would be reformed under legislation introduced today by State Senator Patricia Van Pelt.

    “My goal is to reform the use of gang databases so that we can ensure the data is accurate and can be effective in helping reduce gang-related activity while still protecting people’s rights.” Van Pelt, a Chicago Democrat, said. “We need to make sure people aren’t being added to the gang database when they shouldn’t be, something that has proven to be problematic for countless Chicagoans over the years.”

    The legislation was crafted after experts, advocates and community members voiced their concerns at an April 20 Senate committee hearing about the Chicago Police Department’s use of gang databases and its effect on communities.

  • Hunter works to expand influenza research and prevention

    Sen. Hunter works to expand influenza research and prevention SPRINGFIELD – After an increase in hospital visits during what was reported as an extremely harsh flu season, State Senator Mattie Hunter (D- Chicago) increased efforts to provide students and parents research and prevention materials regarding influenza.

    “There was a very rapid increase in the number of people going to see their doctors or health care providers with flu related symptoms,” said Hunter. “We have to get in front of this issue by providing children and families the information they need to live healthy lives.”

  • Hunter works to close disparities in special education

    hunter 041918SPRINGFIELD – In response to the alarming report released by WBEZ in 2017, which uncovered that Chicago Public Schools had been intentionally scaling back their special education funding and services, State Senator Mattie Hunter (D- Chicago) sponsored legislation to reexamine the school system's approach.

    “Children with special needs should have the same opportunities regardless of race or socioeconomic background,” Hunter said. “It is our job as public officials and the mission of CPS to provide an opportunity for every student to reach his or her full potential academically.”

  • Hunter continues to fight for wage hike for in-home care workers

    hunter 041018SPRINGFIELD – In an effort to increase wages for home care aides who provide in-home services for nearly 100,000 seniors, State Senator Mattie Hunter (D- Chicago) backed legislation to improve the quality of health care in the state of Illinois.

    “Home care aides provide valuable services that not everyone can handle or are willing to do,” said Hunter. “The tasks that come with their work load are difficult but much needed in this state. The individuals willing to serve in this profession deserve to be compensated with higher pay and health coverage.”

    Currently, the average wage for home care aides through the Illinois Department on Aging’s (IDOA) Community Care Program is only $10.98 per hour. Senate Bill 3511 aims to increase that wage to $19.89 on July 1, 2018 and by $1 each year after that.

    “Better wages and benefits would bring stability to a vital workforce that experiences high rates of burnout and turnover.” Hunter said. “Unfortunately, many of our skilled professionals leave the industry in search of better paying jobs. High turnover causes confusion and uncertainty in the lives of these seniors who rely on the workers for daily care and compassion.”

    For seven years, the program rates have gone unchanged. Workers that have chosen to stay in the field struggle with low wages falling further behind as cost-of-living continues to increase.

    The legislation passed out of the Human Services Committee and will be called in the Illinois Senate for further consideration.

  • Senators outraged at governor's veto of gun safety measure

    gun dealerIn spite of repeated pleas from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle and in both chambers to support commonsense measures to curb gun violence and help sweep unregistered firearms off the streets, the governor vetoed Senate Bill 1657, the Gun Dealer Licensing Act.

    According to a 2014 report from the University of Chicago Crime Lab, almost 20 percent of all guns recovered from crimes scenes in Chicago between 2009 and 2013 came from three of the state’s 2,400 dealers. Although Democratic and Republican lawmakers supported the gun dealer licensing legislation, along with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, CPD Superintendent Eddie Johnson and many gun safety advocates and victims' families, the governor vetoed the bill today.

  • Senate Dems react to governor's Fiscal 2019 budget address

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  • Senate Black Caucus to Rauner: We need true leadership (VIDEO)

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  • Hunter responds to Claypool resignation, calls on Jackson, Clark to keep schools open

    SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) issued the following statement in response to Chicago Public Schools CEO Forrest Claypool’s resignation:

    “With today’s departure of Chicago Public Schools CEO Forrest Claypool, I am calling on Janice Jackson and Frank Clark to keep our schools open and put the resources in place to educate and support our children.” 

    Janice Jackson currently serves as Chief Education Officer for Chicago Public Schools. Frank Clark currently serves as President of the Chicago Board of Education.

  • Collins, Hunter express outrage over planned school closures

    hunter collins 120617Englewood would have no high schools under proposal by Mayor Emanuel

    CHICAGO – Joined by fellow lawmakers Wednesday morning, State Senators Jacqueline Collins and Mattie Hunter voiced their opposition to a move by Mayor Rahm Emanuel to shutter four schools in the Englewood neighborhood.

    “I stand alongside my colleagues, united in disappointment and outrage as, once again, Mayor Emanuel chooses to pull the rug out from under our public schools,” Collins said. “Years of negotiations in the General Assembly finally came to fruition this year when Democrats and Republicans rejected politics, embraced compromise, and came together to make a fairer system for our children.

  • Cullerton announces appointments to sexual harassment awareness task force

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  • Illinois Legislative Senate Black Caucus: Congress needs to act on CHIP

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  • New Hunter law identifies food deserts

    hunter 022817SPRINGFIELD – In an effort to provide information about health issues and access to quality food options, House Bill 3157, backed by State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) has become law.

    “This lack of access can usually be found in underprivileged areas,” said Hunter. “Most families in food deserts also live without a car, strictly relying on public transportation to commute. I believe everyone, regardless of location, should have access to quality produce. It’s important to build partnerships among local government and businesses to tackle this growing problem.”

    House Bill 3157 will require the Department of Public Health to provide the General Assembly with an annual report that identifies the locations of food deserts, along with analysis on the health impacts in such locations.

    A food desert is defined as a location with a lack of grocery stores, farmers' markets, or healthy food providers, thus leading local residents to rely on unhealthier food options.

    The legislation becomes June 1, 2018.

  • Hunter measure increasing employment for youth becomes law

    hunter 050417SPRINGFIELD – A new law sponsored by State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) will aid qualified homeless and court-involved youth in finding potential job openings.

    “Cuts made to the budget have decimated critical funding for youth employment programs,” said Hunter. “It seems as though year after year we make more cuts failing our youth and their future opportunities.”

    House Bill 2987 requires a state agency to notify the Department of Human Services, the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Children and Family Services of available job openings. Those agencies are then required to notify qualified applicants, and then keep record of the number of job applications they receive.

    “This legislation is simply about giving youth a fighting chance to enter the workforce,” Hunter said. “Our youth should not be left homeless and jobless. We all heavily rely on employment and other resources to meet our basic living needs.”

    Qualified applicants are to be 21 years of age or younger, and are currently or have been a dependent child in foster care, a homeless youth or a court-involved youth.

    The legislation becomes effective Jan. 1, 2018.

  • New Hunter law streamlines criminal record sealing

    hunter 082517SPRINGFIELD – In an effort to streamline the sealing of criminal records, a new law backed by State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) will allow a defendant to immediately petition for the sealing of arrests or charges following an acquittal or dismissal of a case.

    “This bill is a step in the right direction toward correcting unfair practices in our criminal justice system,” said Hunter. “Far too many people deal with the consequences of an unfair judicial system after being wrongfully convicted.”

    House Bill 514 provides that following acquittal or dismissal, a defendant must be informed by the court of the petition procedure and his or her eligibility for immediate sealing of the records. A petition may then be brought by the defendant's attorney, and decisions concerning the immediate sealing of records may be made at the very same hearing.

    In the event that the petition is not granted, the petitioner, State's Attorney or State Police may file a motion to vacate, modify, or reconsider the order of the petition to immediately seal the records within 60 days of service of the order denying the original petition.

    House Bill 514, however, will not impede on a person's right to petition for sealing of these charges at a later date.

    This legislation becomes effective immediately.

  • Feminine hygiene products, free and accessible to adolescent students

    hunter 052517SPRINGFIELD – Feminine hygiene products will now be free and accessible for students grades 6-12 in public and charter schools thanks to legislation backed by State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago).

    “This is not only about personal hygiene but about dignity as well,” said Hunter. “One of the reasons girls miss many days of school is because they do not have access to these products. We as women know that a menstrual cycle is something we don’t plan, it just happens, so it’s an absolute necessity to supply our younger women with the resources they need.”

    House Bill 3215 is an initiative of “Illinois Moving Women Forward,” a group that aims to remove gender inequalities in order to enable women to achieve their full potential. Of their three principles, the group’s main focus is to protect and improve access to affordable healthcare for women.

    “Our younger women deserve to be taken care of and we as a state can do so at a small expense,” Hunter said.

    The legislation will make the products available, at no cost to students, in the bathroom of school buildings.

    The legislation becomes effective Jan. 1, 2018.

  • Hunter: Governor’s veto will further delay funds to our most vulnerable citizens

    Sen. Mattie HunterSPRINGFIELD – In response to Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto to House Bill 3143, a plan that would expand the Prompt Payment Act to ensure all human service contractors and vendors receive payments on time, State Senator Mattie Hunter (D- Chicago) released the following statement:  

    “We should treat the people that care for our most vulnerable citizens fairly. Human services have suffered tremendously for the two years we’ve gone without a budget. Programs like Redeploy Illinois, homeless youth services and many others have been bearing the financial burden of the state of Illinois.

    The governor’s veto will further delay funds to our most vulnerable citizens. It’s time we prioritized the payments human service providers need but also compensate organizations for delayed payments.”