IDHS

  • Bennett supports new mental health programs coming to Illinois

    mentalhealth 080620CHAMPAIGN— In response to the increased need for mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic, State Senator Scott Bennett (D-Champaign) is pleased to announce new programs from the Illinois Department of Human Services to support individuals in crisis.

    “As the pandemic wears on, people are continuing to face mental health challenges,” Bennett said. “It’s encouraging to see these new programs will be available to people in our community who may need additional support at this time.” 

    IDHS introduced three new programs Monday to help Illinoisans struggling with mental health, developed in coordination with community mental health centers and nontraditional service providers across the state.

    The first new program, the Living Room Program, is designed specifically for those in need of a crisis respite program to divert crises and break the cycle of psychiatric hospitalization. It provides a safe, inviting, home-like atmosphere where people can calmly process a crisis event while learning how to avoid a future crisis.

    The Transitional Living Centers Program is a housing resource for people with mental illnesses who are in need of a place to stay while they work to find permanent housing.

    Additionally, the Transitional Community Care and Support Programs offer assistance to current patients of state-operated psychiatric hospitals who are preparing to be discharged. It will include funding for non-traditional supports, such as cell phones, food, clothing, transportation and other resources that are necessary for individuals to succeed as they transition back into communities.

    Individuals seeking help from the Living Room Program may be referred by first responders or medical professionals. Participants of the other two programs will be referred by IDHS and other providers. Anyone who thinks they may benefit from these programs should talk to their mental health provider.

    For more information and to find additional mental health resources, click here.

  • Joyce urges residents in need of support to explore new mental health program options

    joyce 031020PARK FOREST— With pandemic-related stress weighing heavily on many Illinoisans, State Senator Patrick Joyce (D-Park Forest) is encouraging residents to explore to the Illinois Department of Human Services’ new mental health programs.

    “The additional stressors people are facing caused by the pandemic can be difficult to navigate with the uncertainty around us,” Joyce said. “Pandemic or not, we need to focus on people’s mental health, and these new programs will ensure there are resources available for those in need.”

    IDHS introduced three new programs Monday to help Illinoisans struggling with mental health, developed in coordination with community mental health centers and nontraditional service providers across the state.

    The first new program, the Living Room Program, is designed specifically for those in need of a crisis respite program to divert crises and break the cycle of psychiatric hospitalization. It provides a safe, inviting, home-like atmosphere where people can calmly process a crisis event while learning how to avoid a future crisis.

    The Transitional Living Centers Program is a housing resource for people with mental illnesses who are in need of a place to stay while they work to find permanent housing.

    Additionally, the Transitional Community Care and Support Programs offer assistance to current patients of state-operated psychiatric hospitals who are preparing to be discharged. It will include funding for non-traditional supports, such as cell phones, food, clothing, transportation and other resources that are necessary for individuals to succeed as they transition back into communities.

    Individuals seeking help from the Living Room Program may be referred by first responders or medical professionals. Participants of the other two programs will be referred by IDHS and other providers. Anyone who thinks they may benefit from these programs should talk to their mental health provider.

    For more information and to find additional mental health resources, click here.

  • Stadelman highlights new mental health programs

    stadelman 030920ROCKFORD— State Senator Steve Stadelman (D-Rockford) is highlighting the Illinois Department of Human Services’ new mental health programs to help people who need additional resources for crisis support, housing and community care during their times of need.

    “As we continue to navigate these uncertain times, now more than ever, it’s important to provide people with help they need,” Stadelman said. “These new and innovative programs will help people get the help they need.”

    IDHS announced three new mental health programs Monday to provide additional support for Illinoisans. The agency worked with community mental health centers and non-traditional service providers to develop capacity and to deliver clinical services and non-traditional supports.

    A new program called the Living Room Program is designed specifically for people in need of a crisis relief program to break the cycle of psychiatric hospitalization. It provides a safe and welcoming atmosphere where individuals can process an event while learning how to avoid a future crisis.

    The Transitional Living Centers Program is a housing resource for people who have mental illnesses and who are in need of an immediate place to stay while they work to find permanent housing.

    Additionally, the Transitional Community Care and Support Programs are for people who are currently in IDHS State Operated Psychiatric Hospitals and preparing to be discharged. It will include funding for non-traditional supports, such as cell phones, food, clothing, transportation, and other resources that are necessary for individuals to succeed as they transition back into communities.

    Individuals seeking help from the Living Room Program may seek help directly or be referred by first responders or medical professionals. Participants of the other two programs will be referred by IDHS and other providers.

    For more information and to find additional mental health resources, click here.

  • Belt supports new IDHS mental health programs

    belt 030520EAST ST. LOUIS – State Senator Christopher Belt (D-Centreville) applauds the Illinois Department of Human Services for creating three new mental health programs for Illinoisans in need of help during a challenging time. 

    “The COVID-19 virus has not only hurt people’s physical health — it has also diminished the mental health of many,” Belt said. “Providing residents with mental health resources will support them during the overwhelming stress of the pandemic.” 

    The Illinois Department of Human Services announced the new mental health programs Monday to provide additional support for Illinoisans. The agency worked with community mental health centers and non-traditional service providers to develop capacity and to deliver clinical services and non-traditional supports. 

    The first new program — pegged as the Living Room Program — is designed specifically for those in need of a crisis respite program to divert crises and break the cycle of psychiatric hospitalization. It provides a safe, inviting, home-like atmosphere where people can calmly process a crisis event while learning how to avoid a future crisis. 

    The Transitional Living Centers Program is a housing resource for people who have mental illnesses and who are in need of an immediate place to stay while they work to find permanent housing. 

    Additionally, the Transitional Community Care and Support Programs are for people who are currently in IDHS State Operated Psychiatric Hospitals and preparing to be discharged. It will include funding for non-traditional supports, such as cell phones, food, clothing, transportation, and other resources that are necessary for individuals to succeed as they transition back into communities. 

    Individuals seeking help from the Living Room Program may seek help directly or be referred by first responders or medical professionals. Participants of the other two programs will be referred by IDHS and other providers.

    For more information and to find additional mental health resources, click here.

  • Glowiak Hilton: New mental health programs available

    counseling 080420WESTERN SPRINGS – State Senator Suzy Glowiak Hilton (D-Western Springs) urged those who are struggling with mental health issues to see if they qualify for help through three new Illinois Department of Human Services’ designed to provide housing, crisis support and community care resources.

    “We're all laboring under heavy mental and emotional burdens right now, so we can't forget how much harder of a struggle this is for our friends and neighbors who are managing mental health issues,” Glowiak Hilton said. “Those in need should reach out to local service providers to see what options are available to them.”

    IDHS’ new programs include the Living Room Program, Transitional Living Centers Program and the Transitional Community Care and Support Program. All three coordinate with community-based mental health centers and non-traditional service providers to increase access to the services they offer, as well as to develop their clinical services.

    The Living Room Program is designed to break the cycle of psychiatric hospitalization by providing a safe, home-like environment for people to go to process mental health crises. Peer run crisis services are used to provide a less traumatic and more empowering alternative for people experiencing a mental health crisis.

    The Transitional Living Centers Program provides immediate housing to people living with mental illness while they work to find permanent housing. Priority is given to those being discharged from psychiatric hospitals who are at risk for homelessness.

    The Transitional Community Care and Support Program assists uninsured or underinsured patients transitioning out of psychiatric care. The program includes funding for non-traditional supports, such as cell phones, food, clothing, transportation and other resources that are necessary for individuals to succeed as they transition back into communities.

    For more information and a full list of IDHS’ mental health programs, visit their website.

  • Morrison announces job creation for underserved youth

    park worker 072120DEERFIELD — State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Lake Forest) is highlighting the Illinois Department of Human Services’ COVID-19 Summer Youth Employment Program, which created 100 summer jobs for Lake County teens.

    “So many teens rely on summer work — especially those who live in low-income households,” Morrison said. “The current pandemic made finding jobs more difficult. However, thanks to the program, dozens of teens will be able to earn money while learning skills they can put to use both now and for years to come.”

    Lake County-based Employee Connections was one of 30 youth employment providers to receive $500,000 to employ 100 youth between June and August. The program will provide a total of $9.3 million to support dozens of projects across counties hardest hit by the pandemic, which in turn will employ thousands of teens.

    Many people — both teens and adults — have struggled to find work during the COVID-19 health crisis. The program will curb those struggles by putting Lake County teens to work while helping complete projects in the community.

    “The program will allow teens to kick start their careers by learning the skills they need to succeed in the future,” Morrison said. “This is a great opportunity for young adults to receive career training that will shape them into community leaders for years to come.”

  • State helps support struggling hospitals

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  • Sandoval praises IDHS for early issuance of SNAP benefits

    sandoval 041118­SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) commended the Illinois Department of Human Services’ decision Wednesday to issue Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits early to avoid a disruption that could hurt Illinois families on the Southwest side of Chicago.

    “Struggling families should not have to worry about where their next meal will come from because of the president’s costly and unnecessary government shutdown,” Sandoval said. “I am pleased to see that IDHS recognizes the importance of ensuring that Illinois families are able to claim the benefits they need to get through difficult times.”

    March SNAP benefits will be loaded into recipients’ accounts on March 1.

    February benefits through the program were issued in January as a result of the federal government shutdown, leaving a long gap before recipients would again be able to claim benefits on which they rely. Benefits are typically issued at different times throughout the month.

    SNAP is a federal program that provides food subsidies to families who cannot afford to buy groceries.