Scott's Law

  • Munoz strengthens Scott’s Law to prevent roadway fatalities

    Sen. Tony Munoz

    ROCKFORD – To prevent more tragic losses of emergency responders and highway workers, Assistant Majority Leader Tony Munoz’s (D-Chicago) legislation that strengthens Scott’s Law and finds a way to end senseless roadway fatalities was signed into law today.

    “There is no reason why officers and first responders can’t be safe while addressing an incident on the side of the road,” Munoz said. “It needs to be second nature for drivers to slow down and move over whenever any vehicle is stalled on the side of the road.”

    This year, Troopers Christopher Lambert, Brooke Jones-Story and Gerald Ellis were killed in the line of duty when hit by vehicles while their patrol vehicles were stalled on the side of the road. The law was initially passed in memory of Lieutenant Scott Gillen.

  • Senators invest in road safety by taking aim at distracted driving

    Distracted driver

    Distracted driving and driver safety are issues that always need attention. As more young people drive and technology gets faster, the need to remind people of the perils of distracted driving increases exponentially.

    Senate Democrats approached road safety with an even greater sense of urgency following a tragically dangerous year for Illinois State Troopers on the road. In total, 15 state police cruisers were struck while on the side of the road. Three of those accidents resulted in fatalities in what was described as an unprecedented spike in collisions.

    State Senator Steve Stadelman passed Senate Bill 86, which clarifies that drivers may not use electronic devices to stream videos while they are driving, including tablets, laptops and video game controllers.

  • Cullerton pushes for increased awareness of Scott’s Law in the wake of a deadly season for Illinois State Troopers

    Illinois State TrooperVILLA PARK – In light of the last couple of deadly months on the highway for the Illinois State Troopers, Senator Tom Cullerton is pushing for greater awareness of existing laws that require Illinois drivers to slow down and give officers a wide berth.

    Cullerton (D-Villa Park) championed Senate Bill 947, which would require the Secretary of State to include information about Scott’s Law in every vehicle registration notice it sends to motorists. Scott’s Law requires that drivers must move over, if possible, and slow down when approaching an emergency vehicle.

    “Every day, State Troopers put their lives on the line to keep us safe,” said Cullerton. “In turn, we must do whatever we can to put a stop to these preventable, senseless accidents. It is plain and simple – when you see an emergency vehicle pulled over on the side of the road, you need to move over.”

  • Munoz reminds drivers to switch lanes when passing a stranded vehicle

    Kennedy expressway

    Assistant Majority Leader Antonio “Tony” Munoz (D-Chicago) reminds drivers to be cautious when driving on expressways and move over when approaching a vehicle stranded on the side of the road.

    In 2000, Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department was struck and killed by an intoxicated driver on the Dan Ryan Expressway. As a way to commemorate his life and protect emergency personnel from accidents or injury, Scott’s Law was passed to enforce penalties on drivers who cause accidents, injuries, or don’t yield to emergency vehicles.

    Recently, that law was expanded to cover all stranded motor vehicles as far too many accidents have occurred involving vehicles stranded on the expressway.