IEPA

  • Joyce promotes hazardous waste collection event at Kankakee Community College

    haz waste 091520KANKAKEE –State Senator Patrick Joyce (D-Essex) is encouraging Kankakee County residents to dispose of their household hazardous waste at a collection event on Saturday, Sept. 26 from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

    “This event provides residents of Kankakee County and surrounding areas the opportunity to safely and responsibly dispose of unwanted household chemicals and other hazardous products,” Joyce said. “This event will lead to safer homes and a cleaner environment for our community.”

    The free event is sponsored by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and will take place at Kankakee Community College, located at 100 College Drive in Kankakee, allowing residents to dispose of unused or leftover household products commonly found in homes at no cost.

    Residents are encouraged to bring chemical cleaners, oil-based paints, thinners, antifreeze, motor oil, gasoline, kerosene, weed killers, insecticides and pesticides, old or outdated medication, and similar hazardous household products. Fluorescent and other high-intensity discharge lamps may also be brought to the collection event.

    For safe transport of household hazardous waste, residents are asked to:

    • Pack household hazardous waste items in a disposable box to avoid spilling during transport.
    • Keep like chemicals together and separate unlike chemicals.
    • Secure lids and make sure containers are not leaking.
    • Place box(es) of household hazardous waste in the empty trunk of the vehicle, away from passengers, during transport.
    • Remain in the vehicle at collection site. On-site personnel will remove the household hazardous waste from the trunk of the vehicle.

    The following items cannot be disposed of during the event:latex paint, explosives, propane tanks, fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, agricultural chemicals and business wastes. A complete list of household hazardous wastes that are and are not accepted is available online here

    The collection event is open to all Illinois residents. For questions or additional information, please contact the Waste Reduction Unit of the Illinois EPA at 217-524-3300.

  • Bennett’s landmark legislation to clean up coal ash becomes law

    Sen. Scott BennettCHAMPAIGN – A proposal by State Senator Scott Bennett (D-Champaign) to provide Illinois communities the protection they need from toxic coal ash pollution was signed into law today.

    “This was about preventing coal ash waste from threatening our water and our communities throughout the state,” Bennet said. “I am relieved that we now have the protections, regulations and financial assurances in place that we need to prevent more coal ash crises from happening in Illinois."

    The new law addresses the closure of waste pits across the state filled with coal ash, a toxic byproduct of burning coal. There are approximately 25 known coal ash impoundments which are already closed in the state.

    Bennett’s measure would establish processes to address the other 50-plus impoundment sites which have yet to close.

  • Bennett: Let’s prevent more toxic coal ash crises in Illinois

    Sen. Scott BennettSPRINGFIELD – State Senator Scott Bennett (D-Champaign) joined legislators, environmental groups and community leaders from across Illinois Tuesday to call on the General Assembly to be proactive about the hazardous coal ash pollution threatening Illinois lakes, rivers and streams.

    “Coal ash pollution is not a partisan issue,” Bennet said. “There are coal ash pits in essentially every legislative district, so it’s important to recognize that it’s not a problem for one part of the state or one political party. It’s a problem for the state of Illinois.”

    Bennett championed the Coal Ash Pollution Prevention Act to address this issue. Senate Bill 9 would direct the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency to begin a rule-making process to require power plant operators to safely dispose of coal ash or ensure that pits are properly enclosed, impose fees on coal ash pits to pay the costs of hiring IEPA staff to oversee enforcement, and require power plant operators to set aside money to pay for cleaning up pits in the event a plant is shut down or a company goes bankrupt.