SB75

  • New anti-discrimination and harassment law takes effect

    bush 032019GRAYSLAKE — Private sector workers who experience sexual harassment and discrimination will have greater protections under the law thanks to a major piece of legislation from State Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) that took effect Wednesday.

    “This law gives victims of workplace harassment and discrimination more protections and ensures they are able to seek justice,” Bush said. “We’re not only changing the law—we’re changing the culture. We’re standing with victims and saying enough is enough.”

    Employers will now be required to provide sexual harassment prevention training once a year, and discrimination against an employee because they are perceived to be a part of the protected class would be illegal, even if the employee is not part of that class.

    The law — found in Senate Bill 75 — also includes major reforms to the state’s ethics investigation process, including making the process more transparent and giving additional rights to victims of harassment and discrimination who file ethics complaints.

    Bush introduced the law after traveling the state as the co-chair of the Senate Task Force on Sexual Discrimination and Harassment Awareness Prevention, hearing from both victims and advocates. Her conversations led her to fight for more protections against harassment and discrimination in the workplace.

    “Preventing sexual harassment and discrimination and ensuring our workplaces are safe is not only good for workers—it’s good for business,” Bush said. “With these measures in place, workers will have more protections under the law, and employers will be more proactive about educating employees and preventing these situations.”

    The measure was signed by the governor last year and took effect July 1.

     

  • Workplace discrimination protections now law in Illinois

    jbt 041118 2PLAINFIELD Women across Illinois will have stronger remedies to fight sexual harassment and discrimination in work places, thanks to a measure supported by State Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant.

    Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) championed Senate Bill 75, which clarifies the ethics investigation process, including making the process more transparent and giving additional rights to victims of harassment and discrimination who file ethics complaints. The measure was signed into law today.

    Senate Bill 75 will require hotels and casinos to provide employees who work in isolated spaces with panic buttons for use if they are sexually harassed or assaulted, and local governments will now be required to report and provide an independent review of allegations of sexual harassment made against local elected officials and makes harassment against contract employees illegal.

    “Illinois’ employment laws will now match the needs of workers from the 21st century,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “As a state, it is our responsibility to put forth policies that promote inclusion and safety.”

    The bipartisan measure passed the legislature with unanimous support.

    “This monumental legislation is helping shift the culture in the workplace,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “I’m proud to join my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to institute new laws that strive to make Illinois a better place to work, live and grow.”

    The ethics provisions in Senate Bill 75 are effective immediately, the panic button provision takes effect July 1, and every other section takes effect Jan. 1.

  • Bush’s sweeping reforms targeting harassment and discrimination signed into law

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  • Bertino-Tarrant fights workplace discrimination

    Sen. Bertino-TarrantPLAINFIELD – Women across Illinois will soon have remedies to fight sexual harassment and discrimination in work places, thanks to a measure supported by State Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant.

    Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) championed Senate Bill 75, which clarifies the ethics investigation process, including making the process more transparent and giving additional rights to victims of harassment and discrimination who file ethics complaints.

    “This monumental legislation is helping shift the culture in the work place,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “Stopping sexual harassment and ending discrimination helps provide a safe work environment for everyone.”

  • Crowe fights for protections for victims of sexual harassment

    crowe 060319SPRINGFIELD – Employees who experience sexual harassment or discrimination in their workplace have new rights under legislation cosponsored by State Senator Rachelle Crowe (D-Glen Carbon) that passed out of the Illinois Senate.

    “Men and women have the right to speak out against inappropriate behaviors at work without fear of consequences or losing their job,” Crowe said. “These acts cannot and will not be tolerated.”

    The initiative creates the Work Place Transparency Act to protect an employee’s rights if they experience sexual harassment, discrimination, harassment or retaliation in the workplace.

    The measure also includes major reforms to the state’s ethics investigation process, including making the process more transparent and giving additional rights to victims of harassment and discrimination who file ethics complaints.

    Senate Bill 75 also:

    • Limits the use of contract provisions intended to prevent an employee from reporting sexual harassment, such as non-disclosure agreements, arbitration clauses and non-disparagement clauses for cases involving harassment, discrimination and retaliation
    • Makes harassment against contract employees illegal (currently, these employees do not have legal protection against sexual harassment)
    • Clarifies that it is illegal to discriminate against an employee if they are perceived to be part of a protected class (i.e. gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity), even if they are not
    • Allows victims of gender-related violence to take unpaid leave from work to seek medical help, legal assistance, counseling, safety planning and other assistance
    • Prevents a union representative from representing both a victim of sexual harassment and the alleged harasser in a disciplinary proceeding
    • Requires hotels and casinos to provide employees who work in isolated spaces with panic buttons for use if they are sexually harassed or assaulted

    Senate Bill 75 has passed the House and Senate and now awaits the governor’s signature.

  • Castro reacts to Senate passing anti-sexual harassment legislation

    castro 060219SPRINGFIELD State Senator Cristina Castro (D-Elgin) issued the following statement after voting in favor for Senate Bill 75 which is a comprehensive sexual-harassment proposal she co-sponsored.

    “This legislation moves us to the culture change we need in regards to sexual harassment,” Castro said. “With the recent sexual harassment allegations sweeping the nation, I am proud that Illinois is doing its part to combat this issue head on.”

    Senate Bill 75 is an omnibus bill, which:

    • Limits the use of contract provisions intended to prevent an employee from reporting sexual harassment, such as non-disclosure agreements, arbitration clauses and non-disparagement clauses for cases involving harassment, discrimination and retaliation
    • Makes harassment against contract employees illegal (currently, these employees do not have legal protection against sexual harassment)
    • Clarifies that it is illegal to discriminate against an employee if they are perceived to be part of a protected class (i.e. gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity), even if they are not
    • Allows victims of gender-related violence to take unpaid leave from work to seek medical help, legal assistance, counseling, safety planning and other assistance
    • Prevents a union representative from representing both a victim of sexual harassment and the alleged harasser in a disciplinary proceeding
    • Requires hotels and casinos to provide employees who work in isolated spaces with panic buttons for use if they are sexually harassed or assaulted
  • Bush passes sweeping reforms targeting harassment, discrimination and ethics

    Sen. Melinda BushSPRINGFIELD – Private sector workers who experience sexual harassment and discrimination will have greater protections under the law thanks to a major piece of legislation from State Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) that passed unanimously out of the Illinois Senate today.

    “This bill gives victims of workplace harassment and discrimination more protections and ensures they are able to seek justice,” Bush said. “We’re not only changing the law—we’re changing the culture. We’re standing with victims and saying enough is enough.”

    Senate Bill 75 also includes major reforms to the state’s ethics investigation process, including making the process more transparent and giving additional rights to victims of harassment and discrimination who file ethics complaints.

  • Villivalam moves to crack down on assault and harassment against hotel and casino employees

    hotelworker 032019SPRINGFIELD – Legislation to improve the safety of hotel and casino employees passed the Senate Labor Committee today.

    “I’m proud that the first piece of legislation I filed in Springfield proactively ensures that workers at hotels and casinos are protected against sexual assault and sexual harassment,” Senator Villivalam (D-Chicago) said. “One of my top legislative priorities is furthering protections for working people in Illinois, and this bill protect some of the hardest working people in the hospitality industries.”