Blood Donation

  • Collins calls on African-American blood donors to help address shortage

    Senator CollinsCHICAGO – With the state’s blood supply declining rapidly in light of blood drive cancellations during the COVID-19 pandemic, State Senator Jacqueline Collins (D-Chicago) called on healthy, eligible African-Americans in Illinois to step up and donate blood when they can.

    “The Black community is in particular need of this help, especially in light of the prevalence of diseases like sickle cell anemia among African-Americans,” Collins said.

    Sickle cell patients are at particularly high risk of serious complications from coronavirus infection. Patients with sickle cell disease depend on transfusions from donors with closely matched blood – beyond the A, B, O and AB types – to reduce the risk of complications.

    According to the American Red Cross, each donation center is required to follow the highest standards of safety and infection control, and additional precautions – including social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff – have been implemented to ensure the health of all those in attendance.

    Red Cross blood centers have seen donations by African-Americans drop by more than 50% since the novel coronavirus outbreak began in March.

    “The most vulnerable members of our community need our help,” Collins said. “If you are healthy and able, please step up and help fill this need.”

    Many blood centers throughout the state have extended their operating hours to meet the critical need for donations. To make an appointment to donate blood with the Red Cross, residents can visit www.RedCrossBlood.org or call 800-733-2767.

  • Belt implores African Americans to donate blood to address shortages

    Senator BeltEAST ST. LOUIS – As the country faces a critical shortage of blood donations, State Senator Christopher Belt (D-Centreville) asks African Americans to donate blood to aid patients with sickle cell disease.

    “Donating blood could save someone’s life, which is why I am using my platform to bring awareness to this donation shortage,” Belt said. “African Americans are primarily affected by sickle cell disease, so it is of utmost importance that African Americans donate blood that can be used by sickle cell patients for transfusions.”

    African American blood donors play an important role in the treatment of sickle cell disease. Patients with the disease depend on transfusions from donors with closely matched blood—beyond just blood type—to reduce the risk of complications.

    Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Red Cross says donations by African Americans have dropped by more than half. As sickle cell patients are at high risk of severe complications from COVID-19 infection, donations are especially important at this time.

    The Red Cross assures donors that each donation center must follow the highest standards of safety and infection control. Additional precautions, including social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff, have been implemented to ensure the health of everyone in attendance.

    Many blood centers throughout the state have extended their operating hours to meet the critical need for donations.

    To make an appointment to donate blood with the Red Cross, residents can visit www.RedCrossBlood.org or call 800-733-2767.

  • Jones encourages African American blood donors to step up for sickle cell patients in need of transfusions

    Senator JonesCHICAGO – Blood drives across the state have been cancelled to prevent the spread of COVID-19, prompting State Senator Emil Jones III (D-Chicago) to put out a call for African American blood donations to help treat sickle cell patients.

    “During the COVID-19 pandemic, the state’s blood supply has gotten dangerously low, which means sickle cell patients may not be able to get life-saving transfusions,” Jones said. “African American communities have already been suffering from limited resources during the pandemic—they need support from their neighbors now more than ever. I encourage everyone to lend a hand to address this shortage.”

    African American blood donors play an important role in the treatment of sickle cell disease. Patients with the disease depend on transfusions from donors with closely matched blood—beyond just blood type—to reduce the risk of complications.

    Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Red Cross says donations by African Americans have dropped by more than half. As sickle cell patients are at high risk of severe complications from COVID-19 infection, donations are especially important at this time.

    The Red Cross assures donors that each donation center must follow the highest standards of safety and infection control. Additional precautions, including social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff, have been implemented to ensure the health of everyone in attendance.

    Many blood centers throughout the state have extended their operating hours to meet the critical need for donations.

    To make an appointment to donate blood with the Red Cross, residents can visit www.RedCrossBlood.org or call 800-733-2767.

  • Hunter calls on African-American blood donors to help address shortage

    Senator HunterCHICAGO – State Senator Mattie Hunter (D-Chicago) is calling on healthy, eligible African-Americans in Illinois to help replenish the state’s blood supply, which is declining rapidly due to blood drive cancellations at businesses, churches and schools in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    African-American blood donors are particularly needed to help patients battling sickle cell disease amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Sickle cell patients are at high risk of serious complications from coronavirus infection.

    “For the black community, this is another layer to our public health emergency. Sickle cell disease tends to affect African-American communities, which are disproportionately suffering from COVID-19 and already lack equal access to preventative health care and treatment,” Hunter said. “Even one donation could save the life of someone in our community.”

    Red Cross blood centers have seen donations by African-Americans drop by more than 50% since the novel coronavirus outbreak began in March. Patients with sickle cell disease depend on transfusions from donors with closely matched blood – beyond the A, B, O and AB types – to reduce the risk of complications. According to the American Red Cross, each donation center is required to follow the highest standards of safety and infection control, and additional precautions – including social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff – have been implemented to ensure the health of all those in attendance.

    “This is a matter of life or death for patients with sickle cell disease and those who rely on transfusions to make it through surgery,” Hunter said. “Now is the time to support our neighbors. I strongly encourage all healthy, able Chicagoans to step up and help fill this void.”

    Many blood centers throughout the state have extended their operating hours to meet the critical need for donations. To make an appointment to donate blood with the Red Cross, residents can visit RedCrossBlood.org or call 800-733-2767.

  • The Majority Report 04/27/20 - Parks, some businesses reopen in May

    majority-report-header-2014

    Unemployment and the CARES Act: What you need to know

    Umemployment

    SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Dept. of Employment Security has released updates on unemployment insurance programs that have been put in place in response to the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on Illinoisans’ jobs.

    Employees who have become unemployed through no fault of their own are eligible for unemployment insurance. A new program covers those workers who are considered part of the “gig economy” or other independent contractors who were not eligible before.

    There are three new federal programs under the CARES Act, the coronavirus stimulus package recently passed by Congress: The Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).

    Read more.

     


    Lightford announces expansion of COVID-19 testing in black communities

    Sen. Majority Leader Kimberly A. LightfordCHICAGO — Senate Majority Leader and Illinois Legislative Black Caucus Chair Kimberly A. Lightford (D-Maywood) is backing Gov. JB Pritzker’s efforts to expand COVID-19 testing in African-American and other minority communities across Illinois.

    “Governor Pritzker’s leadership has been incredible throughout this devastating crisis,” Lightford said. “His announcement today shows his commitment to people from every part of our state, and the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus will continue to work alongside him to support his efforts.”

    Read more.

     

     

     

     


    Bertino-Tarrant reacts to governor's school closure Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant

    PLAINFIELD — State Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) said Friday she supports Gov. JB Pritzker’s decision to close in-person classes for the rest of the school year as a way to keep children and families safe from COVID-19.

    “The decision made by our governor Friday afternoon to close schools for the rest of the academic year is best for the safety and health of our community and all of Illinois,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “Thanks to the hard work and support from our teachers, students will continue education through e-learning and other at-home programs.”

    Read more.

     

     


    McGuire urges people to donate blood, register as organ donor Donate Life

    JOLIET — To help the many people who will need it during the pandemic, State Senator Pat McGuire (D-Crest Hill) urged residents to donate blood, bone marrow and organs during April, which is National Donate Life Month.

    “The pandemic is a cruel double whammy,” McGuire said. “Patients need blood now, and those who survive might need organs later in life due to the virus' damage to the body. People need donated blood and organs for lots of other medical conditions, too.”

    Read more.

     

     

     


    In case you missed it

    MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

    Senator Christopher Belt, Centreville: New coronavirus testing site to open in East St. Louis | Belleville News-Democrat

    Senator Rachelle Crowe, Glen Carbon: Crowe asks residents to be aware of signs of abuse during Child Abuse Prevention Month | Advantage News

    Senator Patrick Joyce, Essex: Only trust information on COVID-19 from reliable sources | Daily Journal

     


    Copyright 2020 - Illinois Senate Democratic Caucus - All Rights Reserved

    Subscribe to The Majority Report

  • The Majority Report 04/20/20 - What you need to know about unemployment and the CARES Act

    majority-report-header-2014

    Unemployment and the CARES Act: What you need to know

    Umemployment

    SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Dept. of Employment Security has released updates on unemployment insurance programs that have been put in place in response to the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on Illinoisans’ jobs.

    Employees who have become unemployed through no fault of their own are eligible for unemployment insurance. A new program covers those workers who are considered part of the “gig economy” or other independent contractors who were not eligible before.

    There are three new federal programs under the CARES Act, the coronavirus stimulus package recently passed by Congress: The Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).

    Read more.

     


    Lightford announces expansion of COVID-19 testing in black communities

    Sen. Majority Leader Kimberly A. LightfordCHICAGO — Senate Majority Leader and Illinois Legislative Black Caucus Chair Kimberly A. Lightford (D-Maywood) is backing Gov. JB Pritzker’s efforts to expand COVID-19 testing in African-American and other minority communities across Illinois.

    “Governor Pritzker’s leadership has been incredible throughout this devastating crisis,” Lightford said. “His announcement today shows his commitment to people from every part of our state, and the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus will continue to work alongside him to support his efforts.”

    Read more.

     

     

     

     


    Bertino-Tarrant reacts to governor's school closure Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant

    PLAINFIELD — State Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) said Friday she supports Gov. JB Pritzker’s decision to close in-person classes for the rest of the school year as a way to keep children and families safe from COVID-19.

    “The decision made by our governor Friday afternoon to close schools for the rest of the academic year is best for the safety and health of our community and all of Illinois,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “Thanks to the hard work and support from our teachers, students will continue education through e-learning and other at-home programs.”

    Read more.

     

     


    McGuire urges people to donate blood, register as organ donor Donate Life

    JOLIET — To help the many people who will need it during the pandemic, State Senator Pat McGuire (D-Crest Hill) urged residents to donate blood, bone marrow and organs during April, which is National Donate Life Month.

    “The pandemic is a cruel double whammy,” McGuire said. “Patients need blood now, and those who survive might need organs later in life due to the virus' damage to the body. People need donated blood and organs for lots of other medical conditions, too.”

    Read more.

     

     

     


    In case you missed it

    MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

    Senator Christopher Belt, Centreville: New coronavirus testing site to open in East St. Louis | Belleville News-Democrat

    Senator Rachelle Crowe, Glen Carbon: Crowe asks residents to be aware of signs of abuse during Child Abuse Prevention Month | Advantage News

    Senator Patrick Joyce, Essex: Only trust information on COVID-19 from reliable sources | Daily Journal

     


    Copyright 2020 - Illinois Senate Democratic Caucus - All Rights Reserved

    Subscribe to The Majority Report

  • Bush: Blood banks in urgent need of donations

    Blood donationGRAYSLAKE – Blood banks are facing a sharp decrease in donation appointments around Lake County and the state. Outright cancellations of blood drives have also been occurring with more frequency due to COVID-19. In light of the increasing shortages, State Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) is encouraging people to donate blood assuming they are willing and able.

    “If you are healthy and eligible to donate, your participation is critical to helping our healthcare system continue to operate,” Bush said. “We need blood donations to continue to treat illnesses like anemia, cancer, kidney and liver disease, or for surgeries that require a blood transfusion. The more we can produce positive health outcomes for patients, the more literal room we’ll create to address the coronavirus pandemic.”

  • Joyce: Blood banks in need of sufficient supply

    Sen. Patrick JoycePARK FOREST - Due to the cancellation of blood drives around the state because of COVID-19, blood centers are facing a decrease in blood donations.

    “If you’re able to donate blood, please do so,” State Senator Patrick Joyce (D-Essex) said. “Our state and nation can’t afford a blood shortage during the coronavirus pandemic.”

    The American Red Cross Donor Center is closely monitoring the outbreak of COVID-19 and taking every precaution to protect donors from contracting COVID-19 while donating blood. There is also no known risk of the safety of the nation’s blood supply, only the sufficiency of the supply at this time.

  • Bennett: Blood banks in need of adequate blood supply

    Sen. Scott BennettCHAMPAIGN – Blood centers around the state are facing a decrease in blood donation appointments and cancellation of blood drives due to COVID-19. Under the circumstances, State Senator Scott Bennett (D-Champaign) is encouraging those willing and able to donate blood.

    “While our national attention is on the coronavirus, other health issues – like anemia, serious injuries, surgeries, and cancer patients that require blood – continue at pre-pandemic rates,” Bennett said. “If you are healthy and eligible, it is critical to donate now.”

    The Mississippi Valley Regional Blood Center is closely monitoring the outbreak of COVID-19 and has emphasized that individuals are not at risk of contracting COVID-19 from donating blood. There is also no known risk of the safety of the nation’s blood supply, only the adequacy of the supply at this time.

  • Martinez, Noland encourage minorities to donate blood

    Martinez blooddonorsMajority Caucus Whip Iris Y. Martinez (D-Chicago) and State Sen. Michael Noland (D-Elgin) joined the Illinois Coalition of Community Blood Centers at a press conference to promote blood donation during Minority Health Month.

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services designates April as Minority Health Month to draw attention to health-related disparities that affect minorities.

    “It’s very important that we educate the Latino community about the importance of becoming blood donors,” said Martinez, who is co-chairwoman of the Latino Caucus. “The majority of Latinos have type O blood, which is in high demand because it can be transfused to patients with other blood types.”

    Latinos are the largest minority group, but make up less than 4 percent of blood donors. Additionally, Latinos only make up 10 percent of people on the National Bone Marrow Registry. African Americans also have low blood donation and Bone Marrow Registry participation rates.

    “In my own district, nearly 40 percent of people are of Latino and African American descent,” said Noland. “It is imperative that we raise awareness in these communities for donating blood and bone marrow. This is not just a one-time issue; it is an everyday concern and one that needs to be addressed sooner rather than later.”

    It is estimated that one blood donation can save up to three lives. For contact information for community blood centers, click here.