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Continuing care facilities to see licensure streamline

mulroe 041416SPRINGFIELD – Tucked away in a quiet northwest Chicago neighborhood, the sisters at Misericordia Home dedicate their lives to caring for some of the most vulnerable citizens. The mentally and physically disabled individuals who receive care from Misericordia are unique as many receive services from the time they are born to their final breath.

“Misericordia is privileged to provide to more than 600 children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities,” said Sister Rosemary Connelly, who currently serves as director of the facility. “What we are looking for is something to streamline the licensure process and reduce the bureaucracy that is associated with having multiple licenses on one campus.”

Currently, facilities like Misericordia are required by the state to hold multiple licenses for the various services it offers. It can get especially tricky when trying to transfer a patient from one part of the facility to another: An individual may show up on a transfer, but the paperwork placing them there has been held up, causing a delay of care.

Thanks to a new proposal sponsored in the Senate by State Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago), the care would be seamless. The measure would create a continuum of care license for large-scale facilities like Misericorida, removing the necessity for multiple licenses.

“Misericordia is unique in that it provides exceptional care for its vulnerable residents over lifetimes,” Mulroe said. “It makes sense to me that the state should recognize facilities like it under a new, streamlined licensure process to ensure the patients continue receiving the best care they can without experiencing any delays.”

The proposal passed the Senate Human Services committee on Tuesday, unopposed and now moves to the Senate floor for further debate.

New legislation gives veterans paid time off for Veterans Day

mulroe vets holidaySPRINGFIELD – As many state and federal workers prepare for a work holiday on Wednesday to support Veterans Day, many veterans do not have the option to take the day off created in their honor. Senator John G. Mulroe (D-Chicago) is looking to change that.

“Every year, men and women who fought hard for our country’s freedom are required to work a holiday that was created specifically to honor them,” Mulroe says. “That’s just not right, and I think that as a state Illinois can better serve the people who served in the armed forces.”

Under the new legislation, veterans would have the option of taking the November holiday off if they otherwise would have had to work, receiving paid leave. Their employers would need a documented request for the absence. Only Oregon and Iowa currently have similar laws; Minnesota and the U.S. Congress are currently considering similar measures.

“This proposal is a win-win situation, because it doesn’t require a veteran to take the day off, but empowers them through state statute to do so if they wish,” Mulroe says. “We are also looking to protect the employers by placing safeguards in, making this pro-veteran and pro-business.”

Employees who are veterans would not have to take the holiday off; however, they would be required to give 30 calendar days’ notice to their employer that they intend to take the time off and would be required to provide documentation to the employer that they are indeed a veteran.

If the employer would not be able to award the time off due to significant economic or operational disruption, the employer would need to notify the employee within 14 calendar days prior to the holiday and make a good faith effort to award an alternate paid vacation day. In addition, the legislation would create a tax credit for employers for 100 percent of wages paid.

The measure was introduced in the Senate on October 20.

Students visit Senator Mulroe, make plea for MAP Grant Funding (AUDIO)

mulroe highed map groupSPRINGFIELD – Students from across the state visited the state capitol building today to encourage legislators to fully fund the higher education and MAP Grant line items for the FY16 budget. Victoria Prince is a University of Illinois student from Chicago. As a MAP Grant recipient, she was one of the students on hand today at the capitol to explain her need for MAP grants.

“My freshman year I received almost $5,000 from the MAP Grant,” Prince said. “It really helped me afford school and I don’t think I would have selected to stay in state without it. I know a lot of stories about how tuition out of state is better just because they have more financial aid than Illinois is currently providing; so that’s why I think higher education is so important, to keep a lot of students in Illinois and keep up Illinois’ economy.”

State colleges and universities have been fronting the bill for MAP Grants for the first semester of the school year, but college and university presidents have advised the General Assembly that their facilities can no longer shoulder that burden as they move into the spring semester.

Senator John Mulroe (D-Chicago) was an early advocate for higher education funding in the spring.

“As the son of an immigrant, I understand first-hand how difficult it is to pay for higher education,” Mulroe said. “Unfortunately, times have changed and you simply cannot work and go to college anymore. These kids are working two to three jobs on top of the financial aid they receive. We can’t break our promise to them.”

The General Assembly passed HB 4146, but the measure was vetoed by the governor. A second funding measure, SB2043 remains in the House.

Skipping pension payments huge mistake, says Mulroe

mulroe hepcCHICAGO – In response to the recent announcement from the comptroller’s office that Illinois will skip its November pension payments, Senator John G. Mulroe  (D-Chicago) has issued the following statement:

“We have made great progress in the last four years in making our pension payments that have been escalating during that time. It's unfortunate that the governor is unwilling to talk about the budget and our obligations to make pension payments. They are directly connected. The failure to make mandated pension payments will end up hurting everyone in the state; this decision will lead to a downgrade in bond ratings, further damaging our financial outlook. It's time for the governor to put aside his non-budget related agenda and deal with what's of immediate concern.”

Sen. John G. Mulroe

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10th District
(Retired)

Years served: 2010 - 2019

Committee assignments: Commerce and Economic Development; Criminal Law; Executive; Insurance (Vice-Chairperson); Judiciary (Chairperson); Public Health; Subcommittee on Const. Amendments.

Biography: Born July 21, 1959, in Chicago; BBA, accounting, Loyola University; J.D., Loyola University School of Law; member of Chicago and Illinois State Bar associations; full-time attorney; former assistant state's attorney and arbitrator for Cook County; certified public accountant; married (wife, Margaret), four children.

Associated Representative:
Robert Martwick
Michael P. McAuliffe