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Procurement

  • Bertino-Tarrant: local government efficiency, procurement reform are good for taxpayers

    jbt041415SPRINGFIELD— State Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) voted for a plan today that would make it easier for taxpayers to save money by abolishing duplicative township governments.

    “Illinois has more than 1,400 township governments,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “By opening up the opportunity for local government consolidation throughout the state, we are ensuring that taxpayer dollars can be saved and unnecessary or outdated township governments can be abolished.”

    Under Senate Bill 3, local government consolidation procedures that exist in DuPage, Lake and McHenry Counties are extended throughout the state. Townships could merge with one or more adjacent townships. A city or village could absorb a township that occupies the same geographical boundaries.

    Today, Bertino-Tarrant also voted to improve the way state government purchases goods and services, which was initiated because of concerns regarding procurement rules that can be difficult for vendors, state agencies and universities to navigate.

    “We could make government purchasing a lot more efficient if we eliminate red tape that slows down the process,” Bertino-Tarrant said.

    Senate Bill 8 expands the ability of state universities to purchase needed products and services without going through the procurement process. Illinois would be allowed to enter into joint purchasing agreements with other governmental units. Vendors would also be given more flexibility when registering or submitting a bid.

    Procurement reform and local government consolidation will have to be passed by the Illinois House before going to the governor for final approval.

  • Collins: State budget compromise advances in Senate

    collins 022817SPRINGFIELD – State Sen. Jacqueline Collins, D-Chicago, issued the following statement today as the Illinois Senate passed several key parts of the grand bargain legislative package aimed at ending the state’s two-year budget impasse.

    “While I am deeply disappointed that we have approved a gambling expansion, I am grateful that we saw strong bipartisan compromise on supporting Chicago Public Schools, giving voters the power to consolidate local government and taking steps to make sure we do right by taxpayers as we purchase goods and services in state government,” Collins said. “Today we have moved closer to a long-needed solution through compromise and statesmanship that has been sorely lacking in Springfield of late.”

  • Harmon negotiates plan to slash costly government red tape

    harmon 021717SPRINGFIELD – Illinois taxpayers, public universities and state agencies would benefit from a bipartisan plan to streamline the state’s purchasing rules that was negotiated by Senator Don Harmon (D-Oak Park).

    The legislation, Senate Bill 8, was approved in the Senate on Tuesday.

    Harmon said it became clear to lawmakers that the state’s procurement rules are ready for an overhaul. The legislature enacted a series of strict procurement reforms in the aftermath of the George Ryan and Rod Blagojevich administrations because of questions over how they handled contracting, bid-letting and transparency for state business.

    But the rules may have gone too far, sacrificing some efficiency and savings in an effort to deter corruption, Harmon said.

    “We heard from universities, in particular, that the state’s purchasing rules have caused real headaches for them,” Harmon said. “Rather than save money for the state, the rules frequently have caused them to waste more money and time than an average business would.”

    Harmon sponsored the legislation with Republican Senator Pamela Althoff of McHenry.

    The measure is a key part of the Senate’s so-called “grand bargain” compromise deal that Gov. Bruce Rauner is relying upon to achieve a balanced budget for the state. Rauner has pressed for procurement reform as one cost-savings measure.

    Among other things, Senate Bill 8 does the following:

    • removes inappropriate restrictions on the procurement of specialized purchases, including database licenses and food for resale on campuses;
    • creates a pilot program modeled after one in California for the efficient purchase of heavy fleet vehicles, special equipment and off-road construction equipment;
    • requires state agencies to respond promptly in writing to inquiries and comments of the Procurement Policy Board;
    • streamlines the procurement code and protects lowest bids from disqualification for minor or technical issues;
    • permits informational communication between vendors and the state, while still requiring that the inspector general be notified of any collusion or anticompetitive procurement practices; and
    • creates a special committee on procurement efficiency in purchasing that will study ways to further streamline the process; study procurement laws about contracting with minority-owned, women-owned, disabled-owned, and veteran-owned businesses; and study ways to purchase additional goods and services from Illinois companies.
  • Harmon’s measure to cut red tape and streamline state purchasing becomes law

    Sen. Don Harmon

    SPRINGFIELD – Illinois taxpayers, public universities and state agencies will benefit from Senator Don Harmon’s (D-Oak Park) bipartisan measure to streamline the state’s purchasing rules.

    Senate Bill 8, which was signed into law yesterday, changes the way state government purchases goods and services.

    “This new law streamlines the state purchasing process, cuts red tape and saves taxpayer dollars,” Harmon said. “State universities will now be able to purchase products without having to jump through unnecessary and costly hoops.”

    The legislature enacted a series of strict procurement reforms in the aftermath of the George Ryan and Rod Blagojevich administrations because of questions over how they handled contracting, bid-letting and transparency for state business.

    But the rules may have gone too far, sacrificing some efficiency and savings in an effort to deter corruption, Harmon said.

    “Strict state purchasing rules have created more red tape in government and led to more harm than good,” Harmon said. “Rather than save money for the state, the rules frequently have caused them to waste more money and time than an average business would.”

    Procurement reform is one of several measures Harmon sponsored that would streamline government processes and save taxpayer dollars.

    Senate Bill 8 is effective immediately.

  • Hastings supports procurement reforms to streamline process

    hastings052017SPRINGFIELD- State Senator Michael E. Hastings (D-Tinley Park) worked to pass bipartisan and bicameral structural reforms that will make the procurement process more efficient and more transparent for Illinois’ taxpayers.

    Hastings passed Senate Bill 8, a plan to improve the way state government purchases goods and services.

    “This legislation is the product of bipartisan negotiations,” Hastings said. “I’m proud that the Illinois General Assembly came together to work in the best interests of our residents. The next step is to pass a bipartisan budget.”

    Hastings continues to hear from residents across the Southland that procurement rules can be difficult for vendors, state agencies and universities to navigate.

    “Removing red tape and streamlining the process will make it easier for local businesses to bid on state contracts,” Hastings said. “Our local businesses are the heart of our economy. And they will lead us back to prosperity.”

    This measure expands the ability of state universities to purchase needed products and services without going through the procurement process. Illinois would be allowed to enter into joint purchasing agreements with other governmental units. Vendors would also be given more flexibility when registering or submitting a bid.

    Procurement reform was a structural reform requested by Governor Bruce Rauner. Hastings hopes now that the Senate has acted to address the governor’s structural reforms he will work in a bipartisan and bicameral manner to work toward passing a state budget.

    The Illinois Senate has passed structural reforms in hopes the governor will compromise and pass a bipartisan budget that will be kind and compassionate toward the residents of the Southland. 

    “The time to act is now,” Hastings said. “The Illinois Senate has held up their part of the deal. We have passed local government consolidation, workers’ compensation reform and now procurement reform. It is time for the governor to help us help the people of Illinois. Our children, seniors and most vulnerable cannot afford to wait any longer.”

  • Hastings’ measure to streamline state purchasing process signed into law

    Sen. Michael E. HastingsTINLEY PARK - Illinois now has a more efficient and transparent procurement process, thanks to a new bipartisan law championed by State Senator Michael E. Hastings (D-Tinley Park).

    Senate Bill 8, a structural reform to the way state government purchases goods and services, was signed into law today after passing the House and Senate earlier this year with support from Hastings.

    “Our local businesses are the heart of our economy,” Hastings said. “This new law will cut red tape and eliminate barriers to streamline the state procurement process. These changes will make it easier for Illinois businesses to bid on state contracts to help grow our economy and put our state back on track.”

  • Tom Cullerton works to eliminate red tape for Illinois’ businesses

    Sen. Tom CullertonVILLA PARK - Illinois now has a streamlined process to improve the way state government entities purchase goods and services, thanks to Villa Park Democrat Tom Cullerton.

    Cullerton’s bipartisan initiative, Senate Bill 8, is a reform aimed at taxpayer savings that was signed into law today.

    “Eliminating red tape and streamlining the purchasing process will make it easier for local businesses to bid on state contracts,” Cullerton said. “Our local businesses are the heart of our economy. It’s our duty to make this process easier and more transparent to help encourage economic development in our communities.”