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Budget

  • Senator Crowe

    SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Rachelle Crowe (D-Glen Carbon) issued the following statement reacting to today’s budget address by Gov. JB Pritzker:

    “Gov. Pritzker and his budget team made tremendous strides for Illinois today, focusing on our children and the future is something to be celebrated. I commend Gov. Pritzker for his commitment to invest more in both K-12 and higher education institutions.

    Under the proposed budget scheduled to start July 1, 2019, school districts across the state will get $25 million more than required by the new school funding formula – an increase to $375 million from $350 million.

    Higher education will also see a $50 million increase for the Monetary Award Program (MAP) and a $55.2 million increase for public universities’ operating expenses.

    ‘Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and other area public schools have been decimated for too long, and stability must be brought back into our classrooms to invest in our state’s economic growth,’ Crowe said. ‘I appreciate his effort and for sharing my main priority.’

    I look forward to working with Gov. Pritzker on his bipartisan Downstate Revitalization Plan while having discussions on this proposal to agree on a final spending plan that is fiscally responsible to taxpayers.”

  • Senator Peters

    SPRINGFIELD – After viewing Gov. JB Pritzker’s 2019 Budget Address, State Senator Robert Peters (D-Chicago) released the following statement:

    “The previous four years have conditioned me to automatically dislike the annual Budget Address, so it was a pleasant surprise to hear that Gov. Pritzker’s vision for the future of the state is one that is beneficial to all of the people who live here.

    “I’d like to congratulate the governor for what I believe to be some very important and advantageous promises that he made in his speech. I’m glad he vows to increase investment in early childhood and K-12 education, because delivering folks a good, fulfilling life has to start young.

    “I’m glad he vows to invest in social services like the CCAP program and disability services, because supporting those who need it throughout their entire lives is one of the most crucial functions of government.

    “I’m glad he vows to invest in criminal justice efforts and violence prevention programs, as well as move to legalize recreational marijuana. However, I do caution that any attempt to legalize marijuana must be paired with expungement legislation so that folks who are currently in prison for marijuana offenses have a path toward release once it becomes legalized.

    “This is a very good foundation upon which we can build a brighter future for everyone in Illinois that will help bridge the income inequality gap that plagues our state.

    “I recently read an article about the income inequality in Chicago, which is growing at an alarming and potentially unsustainable rate. This hit home for me, because that’s where I live. It’s where I grew up, it’s where the people I represent live.

    “We can use this budget as a springboard to leap toward more progressive forms of revenue, particularly a fair, progressive income tax that shifts the burden off of the black and brown working class families and onto the wealthy people who can afford to pay their fair share.

    “This is a very promising budget. It’s not fully where it needs to be just yet, but I’m confident that with enough hard work, the General Assembly can use this budget as a starting point towards a functional, stable government that works for everyone and leaves no one behind.”

  • Senator Fine

    SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Laura Fine (D-Glenview) issued the following statement after Gov. JB Pritzker’s 2019 Budget Address:

    “It was refreshing to hear a budget address from a governor who is willing to work with the General Assembly to pass a balanced budget. After four years of budget addresses that seemed hostile to cooperation and functioning government, this return to stability is a nice change.

    “I’m encouraged by Gov. Pritzker’s pledge to search for new revenue sources. Any way that we can increase the state’s revenue stream without having to increase taxes on working families is step in the right direction.

    “I was also pleased to hear the governor lay out his legislative and budgetary priorities for this General Assembly. It’s much easier to work with a governor who makes their intentions clear. That allows us in the legislature to set our own agenda in a way that is complementary to the executive so that we can coexist in the way we ought to: as separate but equal branches.

    “Overall, I was pleased with the address, and I look forward to working with the governor along with my Senate colleagues to ensure that the budgets we pass in the future are all fair, balanced and beneficial to everyone in Illinois.”

  • Senator Glowiak

    SPRINGFIELD – Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker unveiled his first budget on Wednesday in Springfield.
    State Senator Suzy Glowiak (D-Western Springs) is happy to hear proposals for a $375 million increase in K-12 education funding to ensure all schools in DuPage and Cook counties see more state dollars in their classrooms.

    “Our schools are finally being funded the right way to help ensure our children receive outstanding educational opportunities without raising property tax bills,” Glowiak said. “I’m happy to see that the state is finally paying its fair share.”

    However, the freshman senator has numerous questions about the governor’s pension funding proposals that would restructure pension payments and delay the target date that the state’s pension system is 90 percent funded from 2045 to 2052.

    Glowiak, who declined a General Assembly pension herself, does not feel comfortable supporting proposals that will delay vital pension payments.

    “Too many governors for too long have kicked the can down the road on our state’s pension obligations,” Glowiak said. “I need further details to decide if I can support a proposal that delays the year we fully fund our pension payments.”

    The budget proposal also included plans to close loopholes for big corporate businesses such as Walmart to help the state find $94 million in savings over the next year.

    “The State of Illinois is breaking away from President Trump’s big tax breaks for massive corporations,” Glowiak said. “We need to focus on finding savings and helping our local businesses prosper in our communities, not handing big conglomerates tax breaks on the taxpayer’s dime.”

  • The Majority Report - June 8, 2018 - State budget winners: Schools, universities, local government


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  • Municipal leaders at a joint panel of the Senate’s two budget committees

    Municipal leaders today told a joint panel of the Senate’s two budget committees that Gov. Bruce Rauner’s plan to strip $131 million from Illinois communities could lead to service cuts, job layoffs and possible local tax increases.

    Decatur Mayor Julie Moore-Wolfe said her aging central Illinois town has few options for replacing the nearly $1 million lost under the Rauner takeaway. There’s an economic impact, too, she said. For example, recent droughts forced the city to temporarily close car wash operators, and a major manufacturer risked a plant shutdown because the water supply was at severe risk.

    State cutbacks also force new fees, such as the one Decatur taxpayers pay to help fund a $90 million lake dredging project. And, Moore-Wolfe added, aging sewers need to be replaced because of government mandates, so water fees were raised to pay for the $76 million effort.

    Despite Decatur’s can-do approach, another year without the $1 million the town of nearly 73,000 needs, austere cutbacks are likely.

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  • sims 041118High anxiety and frustration is expected among incarcerated criminals. But lately Governor Rauner’s administrators at the Illinois Department of Corrections are living under $420 million worth of pressure and they’re hoping lawmakers will quickly send them more money to operate.
     
    Rauner’s Department of Corrections is unable to effectively operate and dig out of the deficit spending hole created by his drawn-out budget stalemate. IDOC officials say they’ve exhausted efficiency methods, all the way down to rationing of toilet paper available to inmates.

  • WIULess than a year after a bipartisan state budget deal restored some semblance of stability for the state’s public universities and colleges, school leaders say Gov. Bruce Rauner’s budget proposal could be a devastating financial blow to their recovery.

    Rauner wants to dump state retirement costs back on the universities as part of a four-year plan to shift $2 billion worth of state costs onto public schools, universities and colleges. The practical result would be layoffs and program cuts along with potentially higher tuition for students.

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  • aquino 062917SPRINGFIELD – State Sen. Omar Aquino, a Chicago Democrat, emphasized the importance of a balanced, full-year budget in bringing stability and certainty to community healthcare providers in his district and across Illinois. Aquino pointed to the toll that the budget crisis has already taken on Erie Family Health Center, a Chicago safety net healthcare provider that has been forced to work through a wide variety of issues over the last two years.

    “I am glad to hear that there is some bipartisan cooperation in state government as we work toward passing a budget,” Aquino said, referring to ongoing negotiations in the Illinois General Assembly.

  • jjc press 062717SPRINGFIELD – Illinois Senate President John Cullerton expressed continued optimism that a state budget deal can be reached before the end of the week and prevent Illinois from going another year without a budget.

    The Illinois House has begun amending the balanced budget plans the Senate previously approved, and legislative leaders met again Tuesday to try to hammer out a compromise.

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