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  • trotter bodycamsCHICAGO – Pensions for hardworking Illinoisans will be put at risk, once again. State Senator Donne Trotter (D-Chicago) released the following statement in response to the comptroller’s announced plan to delay November, and possibly December, payments to pension funds.

    “Failing to make our important pension payments is another crucial commitment undone by the governor’s refusal to negotiate in good faith,” Trotter said. “Skipping payments only exacerbates Illinois’ $100 million pension debt and will continue to hurt the hard-working people of this state.”

  • holmes locgovsSPRINGFIELD — In response to the recent announcement from the comptroller’s office that Illinois will skip its November pension payments, Senator Linda Holmes (D–Aurora) has issued the following statement:

    “I am deeply disappointed to see this administration repeat the same mistakes that got us into the budget crisis we are currently in with respect to the State's pensions,” Holmes said. "We cannot ignore our legal obligation to make our full pension payment. We need to resolve the budget impasse. We cannot continue to hold the budget hostage over non-budget items and incur more financial burden on the state down the road. I oppose this measure and I hope Comptroller Munger reconsiders.”

  • biss snapSPRINGFIELD — In response to the recent announcement from the comptroller’s office that Illinois will skip its November pension payments, Senator Daniel Biss (D – Evanston) has issued the following statement:

    The budget impasse continues to wreak havoc on the people of Illinois, and the longer we go without a resolution, the more pain that will be felt. With each day comes more news about Illinoisans unable to get basic services, devastating nonprofit closures and additional mistakes that will take far longer to remedy than they take to create.

    Indeed, just this week, Comptroller Leslie Munger announced that she will not make the state's November pension payment, a practice that has indisputably led to the current condition of our state pension systems.

    Skipping this payment is simply repeating the biggest mistake of our past, and it puts our state's fiscal stability at even greater risk. We know what happens when we short our pension systems, and credit agencies do, too.

    For all the talk about getting rid of “business as usual” in Springfield, this certainly feels like more of the same.

  • clayborne pens pmtSPRINGFIELD, IL – Comptroller Leslie Munger announced Wednesday that she plans to skip the state’s pension payment for November. State Senator James Clayborne (D-Belleville) reacted to the Comptroller’s decision.

    “We’re heading down a road we’re all too familiar with,” Clayborne said. “We know what happens when we don’t make our pension payments because that’s how we got here in the first place. The comptroller and governor should be using their business experience to bring forth innovation not reviving past mistakes we’re working to eradicate.”

  • mulroe hepcCHICAGO – In response to the recent announcement from the comptroller’s office that Illinois will skip its November pension payments, Senator John G. Mulroe  (D-Chicago) has issued the following statement:

    “We have made great progress in the last four years in making our pension payments that have been escalating during that time. It's unfortunate that the governor is unwilling to talk about the budget and our obligations to make pension payments. They are directly connected. The failure to make mandated pension payments will end up hurting everyone in the state; this decision will lead to a downgrade in bond ratings, further damaging our financial outlook. It's time for the governor to put aside his non-budget related agenda and deal with what's of immediate concern.”

  • raoul DRSPRINGFIELD — State Senator Kwame Raoul (D-Chicago 13th) issued the following statement in response to Comptroller Leslie Munger’s announcement today that the State of Illinois will skip its required November pension payment of $560 million:

    Illinois’ sorry history of skipping payments to its pension systems has made its unfunded pension liability the highest in the country. The state has used its pension funds like credit cards to fund essential services because of a persistent unwillingness to face the fact that revenue isn’t keeping pace with the needs of its people.