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SB2341

  • collins 042418SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Jacqueline Collins is urging the governor to sign her legislation adding synthetic cannabinoids to the Controlled Substances Act.

    The Illinois Department of Public Health yesterday announced more cases of severe bleeding among individuals using synthetic cannabinoids. According to the agency, more than 160 people in Illinois have experienced similar symptoms, and four people have died.

  • k 2SPRINGFIELD – In the wake of a wave of deaths related to synthetic cannabis overdoses, a new law by State Senator Jacqueline Collins will broaden the classification of such drugs, which often skirt the law through minute tweaks to their formulae.

    “New restrictions on drugs always come with heavy implications, and this broadening of the ban on synthetic cannabinoids came about following careful deliberations,” Collins said. “Many synthetic cannabinoids are already illegal, but by broadening the criteria, we ensure that they can’t be made legal by small and potentially deadly changes to their chemical formulae. I’m glad we acted swiftly to fight this deadly drug.”

    Since March, news reports throughout the Midwest have told of the use of synthetic cannabinoids – called by names like “fake weed” and “K2” – leading to deaths and severe hemorrhaging. The Centers for Disease Control reported that 99 percent of these cases have occurred in Illinois.

    The measure, Senate Bill 2341, adds all synthetic cannabinoids to the Controlled Substances Act and makes synthetics subject to emergency controlled substance scheduling. Manufacturers will be subject to a Class 3 felony charge, while those charged with simple possession would face a Class 4 felony.

    Signed into law last week, it is effective Jan. 1, 2019.

     

  • spice syntheticCollins: ‘We must act now to stop future deaths.’

    SPRINGFIELD – In the wake of a wave of deaths related to synthetic cannabis overdoses, the Illinois Senate approved a plan by Sen. Jacqueline Collins to broaden the classification of such drugs, which often skirt the law through minute tweaks to their formulae.

    “After the careful consideration taken to weigh the implications of new restrictions on drugs, I want to thank my colleagues in the Senate for swiftly passing this legislation, and I urge the House to do the same,” said Collins (D-Chicago). “Many synthetic cannabinoids are already illegal, but by broadening the criteria, we ensure that they can’t be made legal by small and potentially deadly changes to their chemical formulae.”