SB193

  • morrison 032719SPRINGFIELD – A package of proposals passed by State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) reforming the troubled Department of Children & Family Services (DCFS) agency was signed into law recently by Gov. Pritzker. 

    One of the most sweeping proposals signed is Senate Bill 1778, a proposal Morrison worked with advocates and fellow lawmakers on for years to update the confusing set of state rules governing reporting of child abuse in Illinois.

    “The first step in addressing potential child abuse is the reporting of that behavior,” Morrison said. “If the abuse is not being reported – or if individuals don’t know the signs of abuse or who to even report to – the entire system is in jeopardy of not working, leaving abused children in dangerous situations.”

    Also signed recently by the governor:

    • Senate Bill 193, which mandates DCFS to review a random 5 percent of abuse claims that were “unfounded” to ensure the agency isn’t missing key signs of abuse or neglect;
    • Senate Bill 1239, which requires DCFS to immediately refer reports of abuse of a child by an individual who is not in the child’s family to the appropriate local law enforcement agency; and
    • House Bill 1551, which requires DCFS to accept a report of child abuse as a child welfare services referral when there is a prior indicated report of abuse and a prior open service case.

    Morrison – who is Chair of the Senate Human Services Committee and co-founder of the Children’s Health Caucus – has vowed to continue working with colleagues on both sides of the aisle and from both the Senate and House in the coming weeks and months to ensure DCFS never fails a child again. 

    “Ensuring the systems put in place to protect children are actually working must continue to be our number one priority as lawmakers,” Morrison said.

    Senate Bill 193 takes effect immediately. Senate Bills 1239 and 1778, as well as House Bill 1551, take effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

  • Sen. Kwame Raoul

    SPRINGFIELD —  The Senate voted today to override Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto of legislation sponsored by State Senator Kwame Raoul (D-Chicago 13th) that gives the Attorney General greater ability to enforce employment laws.

    Currently, the Attorney General can file suit under the state’s employment laws with a referral from the Department of Labor. This legislation removes that requirement and empowers the Attorney General to bring suits related to violations of laws like the Prevailing Wage Act, the Minimum Wage Act and the Day and Temporary Labor Services Act.

    “We know there are workers who are getting their hard-earned wages taken from them by employers and having their rights violated in other ways,” Raoul said. “Valid claims should not get lost in bureaucratic red tape. It makes no sense to have laws on the book to protect workers if we don’t enforce them.

  • raoul 030118 2SPRINGFIELD — State Senator Kwame Raoul (D-Chicago 13th) passed legislation in the Senate today that gives the Illinois attorney general greater ability to enforce employment laws.

    Currently, the attorney general can file suit under the state’s employment laws with a referral from the Illinois Department of Labor. This legislation removes that requirement and empowers the attorney general to bring suits related to violations of such laws as the Prevailing Wage Act, the Minimum Wage Act and the Day and Temporary Labor Services Act.

    “We know there are workers who are getting their hard-earned wages taken from them by employers and having their rights violated in other ways,” Raoul said. “Valid claims should not get lost in bureaucratic red tape. It makes no sense to have laws on the book to protect workers if we don’t enforce them.

    Raoul worked closely with Rep. Jay Hoffman (D-Belleville), who sponsored the measure in the House.

    “Corporate interests that take advantage of their employees must be held accountable,” Hoffman said. “This measure will give the attorney general’s office more tools to ensure Illinois workers have the right to a safe work environment and that they receive their rightfully owed wages.”

    Senate Bill 193 also creates a task force to promote cooperation between the attorney general and state’s attorneys in enforcing criminal violations of employment laws. It passed the Senate 35-16 and heads to the governor’s desk.

  • link 022817 314SPRINGFIELD – People struggling with multiple sclerosis could have an opportunity to ask for an exception to treatment limitations due to legislation passed by State Senator Terry Link (D-Vernon Hills).

    “Restricting treatment for the more than 20,000 Illinois residents living with multiple sclerosis is atrocious,” Link said. “These restrictions mean that people diagnosed with MS are not allowed to get the medically recommended treatment they need.”

    Senate Bill 193 would require that insurance companies offer an exceptions process for patients with multiple sclerosis to request an exception to a treatment limitation. It would also require that the insurance company would have 72 hours to accept or deny the exception request. Limitations include being subject to waiting periods, cost sharing limits and other limits.

    “By taking this step, insurance companies now have to justify to people why they are denying their medically necessary treatment,” Link said. “This is a small step in the long fight to push for a compassionate Illinois that helps people manage their symptoms appropriately.”

    Currently, insurance companies can limit the number of physical therapy session covered even if more sessions are deemed medically necessary.

    The legislation moves to the House for further consideration.

     

  • Senator Terry LinkSPRINGFIELD – Illinois residents with primary or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis would have an opportunity to apply for an exception from treatment limitations. That is if legislation proposed by State Senator Terry Link (D-Vernon Hills) would become law.

    “Restrictions on treatment for the more than 20,000 in Illinois struggling with multiple sclerosis are disappointing,” Link said. “Some of these restrictions mean that someone is not getting the physical therapy they need to delay the symptoms.”

    Senate Bill 193 would require that insurance companies offer an exceptions process for patients with multiple sclerosis to request an exception to a treatment limitation. It would also require that the insurance company would have 72 hours to accept or deny the exception request. Limitations include being subject to waiting periods, cost sharing limits and other limits.

    “This is a small but important step in ensuring that people struggling with multiple sclerosis receive the care they need,” Link said. “I hope to continue to push for an Illinois that is compassionate and helps those people manage their symptoms appropriately.”

    Currently, insurance companies can limit the number of physical therapy session covered even if more sessions are medically necessary.

    The legislation passed the Senate Insurance committee on Wednesday and moves to the full Senate for further consideration.

  • Senator Michael E. HastingsSPRINGFIELD- Multiple Sclerosis (MS) affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. MS requires a well-thought-out treatment plan that helps people manage their symptoms and live full and independent lives.

    Under current law, companies are allowed to cap the number of physical therapy treatments covered for people with MS under their health insurance policy.

    State Senator Michael E. Hastings is working to change that.

    “People living with MS should have the option of receiving as many physical therapy sessions as needed to help them live independently,” Hastings said. “Insurance companies shouldn’t be in the business of prescribing treatments. The number of treatment sessions people living with MS should receive needs to be decided by doctors, not insurance companies.”

    Senate Bill 193 will change the Insurance Code to require insurance companies provide an exceptions process for physical therapy costs without treatment limitations or restraints on the number of therapy sessions someone can receive in one year.   

    Physical therapy treatments are designed to help those living with MS maintain and improve their ability to live self-sufficiently and complete everyday tasks like go to work. Rehabilitation is an important component of maintaining a quality comprehensive plan for people living with MS at all stages of the disease.

    “Treatment limitations should not be an option,” Hastings said. “We all want our loved ones to be treated with kindness and be able to receive the necessary treatment to live long and healthy lives. This legislation will help us move the people of Illinois in the right direction.”

    Senate Bill 193 passed the Senate’s Insurance Committee with bipartisan support and now moves to the full Senate for consideration.

  • link 020217SPRINGFIELD – Illinois residents with multiple sclerosis could receive easier access to medically necessary physical therapy without the fear of burdensome limits or calendar year maximums.

    “People struggling with multiple sclerosis need access to physical therapy to delay or prevent future problems,” State Senator Terry Link (D-Vernon Hills) said.