SB1862

  • drivesafelyPLAINFIELD – State Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Shorewood) urges Illinoisans to educate themselves on new driving laws that go into effect Jan. 1, 2020.

    In light of the increase in accidents and deaths of Illinois State Police troopers, Bertino-Tarrant backed Senate Bill 1862, which tightens up Scott’s Law in Illinois. The law clarifies drivers need to slow down, change lanes and proceed with caution when emergency vehicles are stopped on the side of the highway.

    “Every day, our officers and first responders put their lives on the line to keep us safe,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “We need to work to ensure it is second nature for drivers to slow down and move over when any vehicle is stalled on the side of the road. This simple step will help keep our police and first responders safe.”

    Fines will also double for illegally approaching, overtaking or passing stopped school buses under House Bill 1873.

    Every year, the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services conducts a one-day count of illegal school bus passing incidents across the nation. In 2018, school bus drivers in 38 states participated and recorded 83,944 incidents during that one-day count. NASPDTS concluded as many as 15 million vehicles could be illegally passing school buses and their students each 180-day school year.

    “Our children should be safe as they get on and off their school buses,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “We need to discourage, prevent and punish careless driving. Our children’s lives on the line.”

    Bertino-Tarrant said keeping people safe is also the goal in construction zones, as construction season returns in Illinois. Senate Bill 1496 increases the maximum penalty for hitting a construction worker to $25,000 from the current $10,000 fine.

    “Driving recklessly through construction zones to shave off a few minutes of your travel time can end up being the difference between life and death for our construction workers,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “We will increase these penalties in the earnest hope the higher fine makes drivers think twice as they enter a construction zone.”

    Bertino-Tarrant urges drivers to research these new driving rules that will go into effect at the start of the year. If residents have any questions or concerns, she encourages them to reach out to her office at 815-254-4211.

    “Safe driving saves lives,” Bertino-Tarrant said. “We all must work together to be better drivers and keep our streets safe.”

  • crowe 050919SPRINGFIELD – A measure to prevent more tragic losses of emergency responders and highway workers, co-sponsored by State Senator Rachelle Crowe (D-Glen Carbon), was signed into law this week.

    “This initiative’s purpose is to encourage drivers to slow down and move over whenever any vehicle is stalled on the side of the road,” Crowe said. “Our first responders are losing their lives because of carelessness, and we can’t tolerate it.”

    This year, Troopers Christopher Lambert, Brooke Jones-Story and Gerald Ellis were killed in the line of duty when vehicles hit them while their vehicles were stalled on the side of the road. The law was initially passed in memory of Lieutenant Scott Gillen.

    Senate Bill 1862, as amended, takes the following steps to strengthen Scott’s Law:

    • • Increases the minimum fine for a Scott’s Law violation without damage or injury from $100 to $500
    • • Makes a Scott’s Law violation that results in damage to a vehicle a Class A Misdemeanor
    • • A violation that results in injury or death would be a Class 4 Felony
    • • Adds a Scott’s Law violation to the list of aggravating factors that may be used in sentencing for reckless homicide
    • • Increases the penalty for a reckless homicide conviction based on a violation of Scott’s Law that results in the death of a firefighter or emergency medical services personnel to a Class 2 felony from a Class 3 felony
    • • Applies Scott’s Law to the requirements for approaching any disabled vehicle

    The law goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

  • police fire 032019CICERO— Senate Transportation Chairman, Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) championed a new law to protect police and first responders on Illinois’ roadways. Sandoval’s measure, Senate Bill 1862, institutes stronger regulations to prevent senseless tragedies.

    “Our officers put their lives on the line every day to keep communities across Illinois safe,” Sandoval said. “We can’t bring back the brave heroes we have lost this year, but we can work to ensure this does not happen to another fellow officer. This new law will help protect the people who work tirelessly to make our state a better place.”

    Senate Bill 1862 takes the following steps to strengthen Scott’s Law:

    • Increases the minimum fine for a Scott’s Law violation without damage or injury from $100 to $500
    • Makes a Scott’s Law violation that results in damage to a vehicle a Class A Misdemeanor
    • A violation that results in injury or death would be a Class 4 Felony
    • Increases the penalty for a reckless homicide conviction based on a violation of Scott’s Law that results in the death of a firefighter or emergency medical services personnel to a Class 2 felony from a Class 3 felony

    The number of troopers hit by vehicles has drastically increased this year, with Troopers Christopher Lambert, Brooke Jones-Story, and Gerald Ellis killed in the line of duty while their patrol vehicles were stalled on the side of the road. Sandoval believes this new law will reinforce the state’s commitment to support Illinois law enforcement and emergency responders.

    “This new law will educate drivers and reinforce responsible driving practices,” Sandoval said. “It’s vital that we stay alert while driving. One wrong move can cost lives.”

    Senate Bill 1862 passed the General Assembly with unanimous support. The new law was signed on Tuesday and goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

  • koehler 053019PEORIA – Existing protections under Scott’s Law, the state law requiring motorists to move over for emergency vehicles pulled over on the side of the road, were strengthened under legislation signed into law today.

    Assistant Majority Leader Dave Koehler (D-Peoria) was a cosponsor of the measure and says that, with the prevalence of distracted driving, the measure couldn’t have come sooner.

    “First responders have enough on their plates without having to worry about getting hit by cars on the interstate,” Koehler said. “This measure is designed to save lives, and I’m glad to stand with our first responders and support it.”

    Senate Bill 1862 strengthens the existing provisions of Scott’s Law by:

    • Increasing the minimum fine for a Scott’s Law violation without damage or injury from $100 to $500
    • Making a Scott’s Law violation that results in damage to a vehicle a Class A misdemeanor
    • Making a violation that results in injury or death a Class 4 felony
    • Adding a Scott’s Law violation to the list of aggravating factors that may be used in sentencing for reckless homicide
    • Increasing the penalty for a reckless homicide conviction based on a violation of Scott’s Law that results in the death of a firefighter or emergency medical services personnel to a Class 2 felony from a Class 3 felony
    • Applying Scott’s Law to the requirements for approaching any disabled vehicle

    Scott's Law is named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department, who was killed by a drunk driver while assisting at a crash on the highway in Chicago.

  • Sen. Tony Munoz

    ROCKFORD – To prevent more tragic losses of emergency responders and highway workers, Assistant Majority Leader Tony Munoz’s (D-Chicago) legislation that strengthens Scott’s Law and finds a way to end senseless roadway fatalities was signed into law today.

    “There is no reason why officers and first responders can’t be safe while addressing an incident on the side of the road,” Munoz said. “It needs to be second nature for drivers to slow down and move over whenever any vehicle is stalled on the side of the road.”

    This year, Troopers Christopher Lambert, Brooke Jones-Story and Gerald Ellis were killed in the line of duty when hit by vehicles while their patrol vehicles were stalled on the side of the road. The law was initially passed in memory of Lieutenant Scott Gillen.

  • scottslaw 053019

  • munoz 051419SPRINGFIELD –To prevent more tragic losses of emergency responders and highway workers, Assistant Majority Leader Tony Munoz (D-Chicago) announced legislation Tuesday that strengthens Scott’s Law and finds a way to end senseless roadway fatalities.

    “As a former police officer, I know the life-threatening situations facing law enforcement every day, and I’m proud this legislation will protect and serve our brave men and women in uniform,” Munoz said. “We can’t afford to lose any more lives, so I implore all drivers to slow down and move over when you see first responders on the roads.”