SB1639

  • Sen. Laura MurphySPRINGFIELD – Lobbyists are now required to disclose more information regarding their clients and relationships to local government units under new legislation co-sponsored by Senator Laura Murphy (D-Des Plaines).

    “It’s clear that we need to introduce larger reforms to change the way elected officials do business,” said Murphy, who served as chief co-sponsor of the legislation in the Senate. “Increasing lobbying transparency is just a start—there’s much more still to do.”

  • martwick 111819SPRINGFIELD – Moving quickly to enact ethics reforms in Springfield, State Senator Robert Martwick (D-Chicago) lent his support to two measures that will help increase lobbying transparency and create an ethics commission that will lay the groundwork for comprehensive ethics reform.

    “Open and honest government are the pillars of Democracy,” Martwick said. “These initiatives will move our state in a positive direction to help change the culture, close loopholes and create clear guidelines for putting an end to the political games corrupt politicians play at the expense of taxpayers.”

    Martwick co-sponsored Senate Bill 1639, which takes aim at the practice of state lawmakers lobbying local units of government. The bipartisan measure would require:

    • state lobbyists to disclose any units of local government they also lobby,
    • state lobbyists to disclose any elected or appointed offices they hold,
    • lobbying firms that contract out other lobbyists to disclose who is lobbying for each business or other client,
    • the Secretary of State’s Office to improve the lobbyist database, integrating these new provisions and making the entire system easier to search and navigate.

    House Joint Resolution 93 creates a 16-member ethics commission to scrutinize the state’s ethics laws and make meaningful suggestions for legislation to improve our standards.

    “Public service should benefit the public, not enrich those of us who serve,” Martwick said. “I urge legislative leaders to appoint members as soon as possible. The sooner we receive the report, the quicker the legislature can act to help restore the public’s trust in Springfield.”

    The commission’s report is due before the end of next spring’s legislative session, so the legislature can vote on the recommendations before they adjourn session in May.

    “I’m committed to working in the best interest of the people of our district to help guarantee government is transparent at every level,” Martwick said.

  • steans 111419SPRINGFIELD –State Senator Heather Steans is pushing for new ethics reforms in the wake of scandals surrounding numerous Springfield lawmakers in recent months, passing legislation out of the Senate today.

    “Today we took the first steps to reform the disturbing, unacceptable behavior that has rocked state government in recent months,” said Steans, (D-Chicago). “Raids, arrests and indictments are not what people expect of their elected officials. While they mean that the ethics laws we already passed are working, and law enforcement is doing its job, it also means we need to change the culture in Springfield, close loopholes, and eliminate grey areas. We need to earn back your trust.”

  • fine 041019SPRINGFIELD – Certain state employees would be required to live within the state of Illinois according to a bill sponsored by State Senator Laura Fine (D-Glenview).

    “Since the salaries of state workers are paid by the taxpayers of Illinois, the workers should be subject to those same taxes,” Fine said. “This also ensures that every state employee has the state’s best interests in mind, since any decisions made will affect them as well.”

    Senate Bill 1639 establishes a state residency requirement for state workers hired after Dec. 31, 2019. If a new hire is not a resident of the state, they will have a three month grace period to establish residency. In addition, the bill gives the Director of Central Management Services the discretion to waive the residency requirement if the employee can prove that their non-residency has a just and reasonable cause.

    The bill would not affect third-party contractor employees or any employee hired before Jan. 1, 2020. It was approved by the Senate with 53 votes and will be sent to the House of Representatives.

  • fine 030619SPRINGFIELD – State workers would be required to live within the state of Illinois under a new proposal by State Senator Laura Fine (D-Glenview).

    “State workers’ salaries are paid by Illinois taxpayers,” Fine said. “It just makes sense that if you’re going to be paid by income, sales, and property taxes that Illinois residents pay, then you should be subject to those same taxes.”

    Senate Bill 1639 establishes a requirement that to work for any state agency within Illinois, a person must live in the state. The measure would not affect employees who work for a contractor that has a contract with the state, and allows for a three-month grace period.

    The bill passed the Senate Committee on State Government and now moves to the full Senate for consideration.