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HB4095

  • equifax 022318SPRINGFIELD- In 2017, the consumer credit reporting agency Equifax announced a massive security breach that compromised the personal information of over 5 million Illinois residents.

    State Senator Tom Cullerton (D-Villa Park) helped advance a measure that will ensure Illinois residents have tools in place to protect themselves in a cost effective and timely manner if a similar situation affects them.

    “Every day we utilize online services that require us to share personal information,” Cullerton said. “This makes all of us susceptible to security breaches similar to the 2017 Equifax breach. And when this misfortune strikes I want to ensure Illinois residents have the tools available to protect themselves.”

    Under current law, consumer reporting agencies are allowed to charge up to $10 each time a consumer wishes to freeze, remove a freeze or temporarily remove a freeze on their credit reports. On top of that, Illinois residents can only request a freeze through certified mail.

    Cullerton’s House Bill 4095 would not only eliminate fees but would also allow Illinois residents to initiate or remove a freeze by telephone and through electronic methods.

    “People should not be penalized for exercising financial common sense,” Cullerton said. “It’s our duty to provide Illinois residents with robust forms of credit protection and identity theft prevention services.”

    House Bill 4095 passed the Senate’s Committee on Financial Institutions with bipartisan support and now moves to the full Senate for consideration.

    For those that are already victims of identity theft or those who believe their personal or financial information has been compromised, Cullerton suggests calling the Illinois Attorney General’s toll-free Identity Theft Hotline at 1-866-999-5630 or 1-877-844-5461 (TTY).

  • Sen. Bill CunninghamSPRINGFIELD – Illinois residents will no longer have to pay a fee to protect their identity when freezing their credit thanks to legislation that was signed into law today.

    House Bill 4095 is an initiative of Attorney General Lisa Madigan and State Senator Bill Cunningham, a Democrat representing Chicago and the Southwest Suburbs.

    The new law will bar credit reporting agencies from charging consumers a fee to place or lift a freeze on their credit report, and gives consumers the ability to do so electronically or over the phone instead of by certified mail.

  • cunningham 031518SPRINGFIELD – Illinois residents will no longer have to pay a fee to protect their identity by freezing their credit thanks to legislation passed unanimously by the Illinois Senate today.

    House Bill 4095, an initiative of Attorney General Lisa Madigan, is sponsored by State Senator Bill Cunningham, a Democrat representing Chicago and the southwest suburbs.

    Once signed by the governor, the measure will bar credit reporting agencies from charging consumers a fee to place or lift a freeze on their credit report.

    “Illinois residents should not have to pay a fee because of the negligence of a credit reporting agency,” Cunningham said. “It is simply unconscionable that a company would charge consumers any fee after they failed to protect their personal information.”

    Under current law, credit agencies may charge up to $10 for each freeze request and each request to lift a freeze. For a freeze to be effective, consumers must contact and pay all four major credit rating agencies, which greatly expands the cost. Currently, only senior citizens, identity theft victims with police reports, and active duty service members are not charged to place a credit freeze. House Bill 4095 would extend that fee exemption to all Illinois residents.

    This comes in response to the massive data breach suffered by Equifax from May to July of last year. As many as 143 million Americans nationwide and 5.4 million Illinois residents may have been impacted by the breach of sensitive consumer information.

    Indiana, Maine, North Carolina and South Carolina do not allow credit agencies to charge fees for freezes and lifts. Additionally, six other states have introduced credit freeze legislation in response to the Equifax breach.

    The bill will take effect immediately once it is signed by Gov. Bruce Rauner.

  • Sen. Michael E. HastingsTINLEY PARK – Credit reporting agencies will no longer allow consumer reporting agencies to impose a charge on a consumer for placing a freeze, removing a freeze, or temporarily lifting a freeze on their credit reports, thanks to a new law championed by State Senator Michael E. Hastings (D-Tinley Park).

    Hastings pushed for safeguards after Equifax announced that a security breach compromised the personal information of 143 million U.S. residents, including more than 5.4 million Illinois residents.

    Equifax originally disclosed the breach in September of 2017, but since then, there have been multiple disclosures from the company that show more vital information was stolen than the company originally revealed. Just last month, Equifax informed the public that a small number of passport images and information were stolen as part of the security breach, despite previously denying such a thing occurred.