HB3435

  • epipens 081219OAKBROOK TERRACE – Minors across Illinois will soon have easy access to EpiPens, thanks to a new law supported by State Senator Suzy Glowiak Hilton.

    Glowiak Hilton (D-Western Springs) advocated for House Bill 3435, which requires certain insurers to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for minors – the fast-acting treatments for severe allergic reactions.

    “It’s our duty to take the necessary steps to ensure this life saving drug is affordable and easily accessible to children in Illinois,” Glowiak Hilton said. “Children with serious allergies should not have to go without a vital epinephrine injector simply because they cannot afford one.”

    Epinephrine injectors – commonly known by the specific brand name EpiPen – deliver the life-saving drug epinephrine to individuals experiencing a severe allergic reaction. Epinephrine works by narrowing blood vessels and opening lung airways, reversing the symptoms of a potentially fatal allergic reaction.

    This measure requires certain private insurance policies to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for those under 18 years of age.

    “Families across our district rely on this essential medicine to keep their children safe,” Glowiak Hilton said. “This small step can help us save lives.”

    House Bill 3435 was signed earlier this month and goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

  • hastings 013119TINLEY PARK – Insurers will be required to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for minors under legislation supported by State Senator Michael E. Hastings (D-Tinley Park) that was signed into law on Friday.

    “It’s unfortunate that we cannot always pinpoint what will give our children an allergic reaction with the rise of so many different food allergies,” Hastings said. “What we can do is provide children with the necessary care they need when an unforeseen emergency strikes, and I’m proud to have supported legislation that will do that going forward.”

    Epinephrine injectors deliver epinephrine to individuals experiencing a severe allergic reaction, curbing the negative effects of the allergen. Epinephrine works by narrowing blood vessels and opening lung airways, reversing the symptoms of a potentially fatal allergic reaction.

    “The passage of this legislation is an effort on the behalf of the legislature and the governor to ensure that our kids are taken care of properly,” Hastings said. “No parent should be put in a situation where they cannot provide necessary medical assistance because it’s not affordable.”

    This new law requires certain private insurance policies to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for those under 18 years of age.

    House Bill 3435 takes effect on Jan. 1, 2020. 

  • EpiPens

  • morrison 051519 2SPRINGFIELD – Insurers would be required to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for minors under a proposal by State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) that passed the Senate recently.

    “With steady increases in food allergies and other serious allergic conditions, we should be doing everything we can to expand access to lifesaving drugs and medicines,” Morrison said. “No child with a serious allergy should be without an epinephrine injector because they cannot afford one.”

    Epinephrine injectors – commonly known by the specific brand name EpiPen – deliver the life-saving drug epinephrine to individuals experiencing a severe allergic reaction. Epinephrine works by narrowing blood vessels and opening lung airways, reversing the symptoms of an allergic reaction that, if left untreated, can cause death.

    Morrison’s proposal, contained in House Bill 3435, requires certain private insurance policies to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors for those under 18 years of age.

    “While this proposal is a needed step in the right direction, our federal government should be doing much more to alleviate high prescription costs and price gouging by pharmaceutical companies,” Morrison said.

    House Bill 3435 passed without opposition on May 17 and will now head to the governor’s office for his approval.