Construction

  • Historic statewide construction package signed into law

    Communities across the state will see renewed investment in their infrastructure under a bipartisan construction plan approved by the General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. JB Pritzker today.

    The $45 billion construction package is the culmination of a three-month negotiation process during which lawmakers traveled throughout Illinois to hear input from local officials, educators, transportation experts and other interested parties.

    “We spent months traveling this state and learned more than I thought possible about the infrastructure needs in various communities,” said State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago), who co-chaired the committee charged with developing the construction plan. “The result is a comprehensive package that takes into account the testimony we heard and fairly invests in communities in every corner of the state.”

  • Sen. Donne Trotter

    CHICAGO – Sen. Donne Trotter is among those who are demanding the governor release state money for completion of a college training center that is expected to prepare students for thousands of transportation-related jobs in the Chicago region.

    Construction on the $45 million Olive-Harvey Transportation Distribution and Logistics Center was halted in 2015 because of the state budget stalemate. Lawmakers included $15 million for the center in the state budget they approved in July. Weeks later, Gov. Bruce Rauner has not released that money.

    “This hold on the TDL Center is hurting the prospect of job growth in an area that desperately needs it,” said Sen. Trotter, a Chicago Democrat and vice chairman of a key Senate budget committee. “It’s time for Gov. Rauner to do what’s right to help train the people of Chicago.”

  • pavingSPRINGFIELD – More than $2 billion in construction projects in Illinois could grind to a halt if action isn’t taken in Springfield before Friday.

    Locally, construction on the $18.1 million Deerfield Road Construction Project would cease unless legislation allowing the expenditure of funds is approved. 

    “The recently announced stoppage of the Deerfield Road Reconstruction Project is just another example of why the state cannot effectively operate without a finalized budget plan in place,” State Senator Julie Morrison (D – Deerfield) said. “Walking away from a major construction project that isn’t completed would not only cause horrific traffic delays but could also be a serious public safety concern for motorists.”

    Deerfield Road is currently in the middle of an $18.1 million resurfacing and reconstruction project between the Metra viaduct in Deerfield and U.S. Route 41 in Highland Park. While the 2.39-mile long reconstruction project is largely paid for with federal funds, the state will soon not be legally able to appropriate federal funds due to the lack of a finalized budget plan for Fiscal Year 2017, which begins on Friday.

    “It is my understanding there is an agreement in place that will allow projects like the Deerfield Road construction project to continue,” Morrison said. “I am hopeful legislators from both sides of the aisle will join me in supporting this plan when the Senate and House reconvene on Wednesday.”

  • koehler 040616SPRINGFIELD – Each year, students at Pekin Community High School participate in a buildings trade program, where students learn construction skills and build a home, after which, the school district sells the new home and uses the revenue to fund the program the next year.

    Legislation sponsored by State Senator Dave Koehler (D – Peoria) that just passed in the Senate will make the selling process much easier for the district by allowing it to use a real estate agent without first going through an auction or bid process.

    “This program is a great example of self-sustainability and goes a long way in showing students the value of hard work in an important trade,” Sen. Koehler said. “By making it easier for the district to sell the homes its students build, we show support for a valuable program that engages and builds up the community in a financially independent way.”

    Under current law, building trade houses must be sold the same way as other state-owned real estate is sold – a sometimes convoluted process that leaves Pekin Community High School District 303 jumping through time-consuming hoops.

    The district’s ability to engage a real estate agent is contingent upon the property being publicly listed for at least two weeks.

    The legislation, Senate Bill 2823, now goes to the House of Representatives.